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Kristi
25th September 2010, 20:39
Do you like learning different languages?If so what languages can you speak? :)

::al Albanian:Native Language
::it Italian:Write,speak,understand excellent.
::uk English:Write,speak,understand excellent.
::de German:Write and understand very good,speak good.
::es Spanish:Understand very good,speak bad and write not very good.
I can also understand and speak few words in ::rs Serbo- ::hr Croatian, ::ru Russian and ::gr Greek.
I can read very well cyrillic.(Greek and Slavic)

What about you? :)

goktengri
25th September 2010, 22:30
you are really great kristi :D

Kristi
25th September 2010, 22:45
Thanks Altug :)

Isabella
26th September 2010, 00:01
That's excellent for your age Kristi ;)

For me it's like this:

1. English - write, speak, understand (I'm learning English 14 years and I still have some problems with grammar) :oops: :lol:
2. German - 4 years of learning. I can write, speak a bit and understand a lot
3. French - 4 years of learning. I can write, speak and understand a bit
4. Spanish - 1 year of learning in foreign languages school. Understand excellent, speak very good, write good. I love Spanish :D

Also, I can speak, write and understand all ex-Yu languages, except Macedonian and Slovenian :lol:
And I understand Italian very good, but I can't speak and write :)

Kristi
26th September 2010, 00:04
^Thanks :oops:

94ayd
26th September 2010, 00:38
Well, I love AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAALL languages, especially all European ones. I mainly speak English, French, Greek, recently started Spanish and Russian but it's been some time... :lol: Around Eurovision, I've really got interested in languages, especially more exotic ones and have tried to at least learn reading some of them. I do kinda know some words in German, Italian, Turkish from some small books but from lyrics of songs many more - Portuguese, Finnish, Icelandic, Luxembourgish and whatever has been performed at the stage of Eurovision... :lol:

goktengri
26th September 2010, 01:07
you guys really awesome but i'm so bad at languages :lol: :oops:

I can speak and understand English, And i can understand Turkic languages very well like Azerbaijani, Turkmen, Uzbek, Kazakh, Kyrgyz. (If you count these ones as a foreign language for me) I know a lot of words in Greek ( as an immigrant from thessaloniki )

And I'm trying to learn to Japanese. That's all. I think i'm going to learn to Finnish after Japanese. :lol:

Starmania
26th September 2010, 01:13
I know some Serbian words.
I'm into Serbian :)

Israeliboy
26th September 2010, 01:21
:DSmart people here

MyHeartIsYours
26th September 2010, 02:07
My languages:

::uk
English (read, write and speak... I think :lol:)
Mother tongue

And that's it :lol:

yulara
26th September 2010, 02:39
French : Mother tongue
English : I do my best and most of time I can understand people and they can understand me, so I consider it ok
German : 5 years studying and all I can say is Ich spreche kein deutsch...
Spanish : well... Una cerveza por favor? and that's all...

Leaf
26th September 2010, 04:53
::ca ::us ::uk ::ie ::au English is my mother tongue.

::ca ::fr French, learning since like grade 1-2, and in 2nd year of French immersion. I can probably understand about 50%, but don't really casually speak it, or understand French natives speaking it, too fast for me :p


::fi Finnish, I tried to learn a bit but I stopped and forget everything.


::cz Czech. Tried to learn this more than Finnish, but eventually stopped and forgot mostly everything. I basically tried to learn it cause of the accents :p

Jukica
26th September 2010, 15:03
VERY WELL
Croatian: mother tongue
English

OK
German - but I don't use it, so I forgot it :lol:

I also know few words in Hungarian :lol:

I can understand other ex-yu languages, Bulgarian (harder a bit) too

Isabella
26th September 2010, 17:15
I haven't used German for a while too, but thanks to one member from Germany on this forum, I chit chat in German every day and it's better :mrgreen:

Anjeza
26th September 2010, 18:34
::de mother tongue; I can also understand and speak some regional dialects
::fr 7 years of learning in school and I lived for some months in France. Write, read, speak and understand almost excellent
::uk 9 years of learning in school (+ one term at university). Write, read, speak and understand very good
::es 2 years of learning in school. Write and read good (if I have a dictionnary beside me :D), speak and understand - complete disaster :D
::pl started to learn a bit, so I can read, write and speak a little bit - but the only sentence I can say without making a mistake is "A beer please"
::nl read and understand a lot as it is close to German, but the rest... I better don't speak about it

Interrail
26th September 2010, 18:36
Serbian - mother tongue (and ofc. I know all ex-YU languages: Croatian, Bosnian, Montenegrin (I don't really consider them as foreign languages cause they're so familiar to me. I Understand most of Macedonian and Bulgarian, and some of Slovene).
Can read Greek alphabet, and ofc. Russian cyrillic is easy to read and to understand some of it.
As about formal education:
I studied French as my 1st foreign language (6 years primary school + 4 years university + 4 years institute for foreign languages = 14 years)
English 2nd foreign language (4 years primary school + 4 years secondary school + 4 years university = 12 years)
I used to learn Spanish by myself, can understand, can speak (with bad pronunciation), can not write properly. Such a beautiful and easy language. My level of knowledge - I can watch TVE with no problem, lol.
In future I'd love to learn Hungarian, Greek, Hebrew...

Scooby
26th September 2010, 19:51
::rs mother tongue + all ex-yu languages (::hr ::ba and understand very well ::mk and ::sl + ::bg which is something between serbian and russian)

::uk understand, write, speak (but my english grammar is just horrible, even I learn it almost 10 years)
::ru Perfect understand and speak, but my grammar is bad too
::fr it's not perfect but can understand and speak

aletem
27th September 2010, 10:01
I can speak/write/or understand:

::mk Macedonian: My primary language (I always had an A in this course from elementary school to high school, I loved it and never found it boring :lol:)
::en English: reading, writing, comprehending, understanding. What is even more important, I am starting to excel in the academic language. Writing big scientific papers, reading academic papers.. :mrgreen: Also, I understand Old English pretty well (The Shakespearean one and somewhat from the older one - like the one "Beowulf" was written in).
::de German: I learned this in school, but I forgot most of it. I can write (spelling is easy) and read very well, but not understand and comprehend as much.:(
The main ex-yu ::rs: :hr ::ba languages: I can read, write, comprehend and understand. I do have some issues with the grammar and I do have sometimes problem with complicate words in literature (especially Croatian literature). And I understand a bit of Slovenian. That one is kind of too distant for me.
::es I can understand a bit + I took Latin and I was good at it, so some things are familiar. I can't write, but I can read and get the accent correct.
::ru I took some courses. I can read and write very well and understand somewhat well. :mrgreen:

I have that language thing in me, but I never pursued it.

Milos-BC
27th September 2010, 17:52
My turn

::rs mother tongue + I speak and understand all other ex-yu languages except Slovenian, where I understand very little.

::uk Very fluent in everything

::ru I've been studying it for 4 years, I don't speak it very well, but I can write and understand pretty much

::bg Can't write, but I understand almost everything (it's like a mixture of Serbian and Russian)

::es I can read and understand some things very well, however I can't speak properly.

And I know some Latin (which I remember from high school :lol: ) too

PoppySnuggleGlass
27th September 2010, 18:10
Ooh Blimey, this thread is going to expose my ignorance when it comes to foreign languages.

Fluent
English: Both of the British and American variety. Not that there's much of a difference of course. Apart from the fact Americans like to extract 'u' from a lot of words and pronounce 'futile' and 'aluminium' strangely.


Intermediate
German: I studied for 5 years and have an A-Level in it. I like to think that I'm somewhat adept at it, but I'm by no means perfect. I can speak German better than I can understand it! :lol:

Basic
Dutch: I spent a few months self-studying the language with the occasional assistance of a Dutch friend of mine. The grammar system was remarkably similar to German so I had no problem getting the jist of it, but I cannot currently hold a decent conversation in it... Yet.

Chinese Mandarin: A recent project of mine which isn't going particularly well! I can say very basic phrases. That's about it.

Turkish97
27th September 2010, 18:16
me :) ;

English: understand, write, speak

Arabic:understand,speak :lol:

Turksh: of course understand, write, speak :D

lucian-crusher
27th September 2010, 18:24
::ro Romanian: Understand, write, speak
::uk English (14 years of studying it): Undersatnd, write, speak
::es Spanish (11 years of studying it): Understand, write, speak
::ru Russian (4 years of studying it): Understand, write
::it Italian: Understand
::hr Croatian: Understand

goktengri
27th September 2010, 18:58
me :) ;

English: understand, write, speak

Arabic:understand,speak :lol:

Turksh: of course understand, write, speak :D

Really ?

No Name
27th September 2010, 19:32
::dk - Mother tongue

::no - I understand the language spoken and written and I know how to spell it since most of the spelling is pretty much identical to Danish

::se - I understand the language both spoken and written though a few words here and there trouble me.

::uk - Been studying it since 3rd grade so I guess that needs no further explanation

::es - Only for household use

::de - I studied it in elementary school and I still remember most of the grammar.

Turkish97
28th September 2010, 20:38
Really ?

yep :)

goktengri
28th September 2010, 20:40
yep :)

Did you learn it with special course ?

ithanspain
30th September 2010, 13:31
::es
Spanish:My mother tongue
Catalan: Also mother tongue

::en
English: learned at school and academy since primary school. Understand speaking and reading, although sometimes I make some mistakes on spelling. :lol:

::fr
French: learned at High School, four year and passed the exam of level A2. But I'm starting to forgotten it, cause I don't used it.

Israeliboy
30th September 2010, 13:40
I make my list again.

::il Hebrew - Mother tounge = Speaking, Writing and Reading
::uk English - Speaking, Writing and Reading (Study English already for 13 years).
::es Spanish - Speaking 50/50, Writing and Reading. But I didn't study the Spanish Grammar, but still can have a conversation.

Arabic - I can write and read. Understand and speak 50/50 (I studied it for 2 years)

::fr - Reading. Speaking and Writing 50/50.

::it - Reading, Speaking and Understand. Not writing (I can write some)!

Kristi
30th September 2010, 13:59
^What about italian? :shock:
You pretend it to be your second motherland and can't speak a word? :o

Israeliboy
30th September 2010, 14:28
Lol I put it now, I forgot...dunno how :/ .....

Kristi
30th September 2010, 18:05
^ :) at least now I'm not the only italian speaking here :lol:

Israeliboy
30th September 2010, 18:58
Be sure :)

DominikS
1st October 2010, 20:41
Fluent in: ::pl ::en
Learning (I can mostly understand it and write and speak quite a bit): ::fr
Know basic grammar and vocabulary, can understand quite a bit: ::de
Understand: ::sk

94ayd
2nd October 2010, 23:02
You can't write in Italian?! It's like one of the easiest languages to do so...

Kristi
3rd October 2010, 00:05
^ditto

MyHeartIsYours
3rd October 2010, 01:07
You can't write in Italian?! It's like one of the easiest language to do so...

Maybe for you but everyone is different :roll:

94ayd
3rd October 2010, 11:11
Well, it's way easier than English because you pretty much write what you hear...

MyHeartIsYours
3rd October 2010, 15:08
Yes you think it's easier but perhaps not everybody thinks the same as you ;).

Israeliboy
5th October 2010, 00:42
Hey, don't forget I didn't study Italian is school as I studied English/French/Arabic.

Kristi
5th October 2010, 14:09
^I neither did :?

strajker
13th October 2010, 11:41
::hu mother tongue
::rs ::hr ::ba it's the same :P at school i go to serbian class
::uk learning it since 2003. I can understand it mainly though there are some words i can't

::de learning it since 2007. Reading and writing is much easier than speaking...

::mk ::si ::bg I understand a bit from these though not sure could i make a correct sentence in these languages xD.

::sk I started to learn it because their ESC entries (2009 and 2010) but later stopped

94ayd
13th October 2010, 21:53
Do you mean ::sl?! That's ::SL in small letters. ;)

seb89
25th October 2010, 19:14
Everyone here is polyglot :D!

::be::nl Dutch: Mother tongue
::be::fr French: near native
::es Spanish: fluenty (writing, reading & speaking)
(I study French & Spanish at the university and I've studied in France)

::de::be German: I can read and understand without problems, but I can't speak it that well
::uk::us English: has always been a problem for me, but I understand and I can read it quite well.
::se Swedish: basic


Last month I began ::il Hebrew classes, but I dropped out :(! Next year I'll try it again :D!!! I won't give up :D

Israeliboy
26th October 2010, 18:23
^^^Shalom, I'm here to help you in ::il Hebrew!

seb89
5th November 2010, 01:33
Thanks :D!! It's a difficult language, but I dropped out because I had obligatory courses for my thesis, but apparently for my thesis I needed to learn Hebrew so I had to change!

I'm gonna try some Hebrew :mrgreen:

Israeliboy
8th November 2010, 18:25
^^^Don't worry, you'll do it :)

Stargazer
19th March 2011, 03:00
Fluent
::se ::us

Basic or Intermediate
::es ::is ::de

Random words or sentences
::fi ::fr

Understand very well (when written)
::no ::dk

Understand a little (when written)
::nl ::pt ::it ::fr

r3gg13
19th March 2011, 04:23
::us American English and Filipino are my mother tongue(s).
::fr, I've been learning since time immemorial, I wanna say I'm decent with it.
I understand the other Romance languages (except Romanian) because of French
::jp, I spoke it as a child, my parents speak it fluently.

Sabiondo
19th March 2011, 07:42
Im fluent, undertand & can wirte verry well in ::es::us

I semi-fluent in ::br can undertand and speak a bit ::it

Trying to learn by myself ::ru

And in the future i like to learn for business & for fun ::de::fr::ua

CypriotGirl
20th March 2011, 01:07
::cy Cypriot Greek
The language I speak every day, since I was born. Although it is not an official language, it has a lot of differences with common Greek, and it is closer to ancient Greek, and similar to the dialect of Crete. There are a lot of words that have Turkish, Italian-Venecian, Old French, English and Arabic origin. (stay tuned for a Cypriot Greek lesson)!

::gr Greek
Officially my native language. The language I learned in school as my first language. I speak it fluently and I dare to say that Im very good in dictation as well!

::uk English
Ive been learning English since I was very little, but I really speak English for only 4-5 years. Since then, I associate with British people, and also with a lot of non-Greek speaking people, so I practice it and Im doing really well, even with the accent! My English accent is good enough, with both British and American elements, but with Cypriot as well! Im tryin to get rid of them!

::es Spanish
Spanish is my favourite language! Ive learned it by myself, from song lyrics and websites. Because of that, I make many mistakes when it comes to talking! But I understand a lot of things, especially when I listen to Spanish songs. If only I had Spanish-speaking friends to practice it

::bg Bulgarian
Last year, I had a 6-month course in learning Bulgarian rapidly! In these lessons, we skipped the things that have to do with grammar deeply, and we focused in the practical things, which are useful in communicating with others. I can understand when I see something written in Bulgarian, but the difficulty comes when I listen to people speaking Bulgarian. They speak very fast, and they pronounce the words in a way that I dont always understand! That was my problem in English as well, but it was solved by associating with British people! Now, I have to make more Bulgarian friends to help me in this regard! I can speak a bit better Bulgarian than Spanish because I had the lessons!

::it Italian
I had lessons in high school, and also in college! But very few things stood out in my brain! I understand quite enough, but when it comes to talking, that is the problem! I say it is a problem, because I speak Spanish instead of Italian!

Because I've learned Bulgarian, I can understand a lot of the slavic languages, like Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Bosnian, Slovenian, and even Russian and Ukrainian. I find it difficult to understand Polish, Czech and Slovakian though!

I can also understand and speak a bit of French, Portuguese and just a little bit of German. I know also some Turkish words natively.

Valvejoodik
20th March 2011, 02:15
::ee - mother tongue
::uk/::us - quite fluent, but i prefer speaking :D
::ru - i've learned it for a 4 years and i still don't get it :mrgreen:
::fi - I can understand it because Estonian and Finnish are close-related. (I believe that Finn also understands me if i speak in Estonian)
::de - Only basic phrases
::rs - I tried to learn it last year but quitted, but i'm confident that I will start again someday:)
(and yes, it was because of a Serbia's last year ESC entry:D)

sannerz
20th March 2011, 03:52
I speak ::us ::uk English and ::rs ::hr ::ba Serbo-Croatian fluently.

I'm starting to learn ::de German, and will take classes in college to learn it fully. I want to learn because I was born in Germany.

I'm finishing up my 6th year in Latin, and can write and understand it excellently. I could probably speak it if anyone was crazy enough to still speak it.

Shqiperia
20th March 2011, 04:34
::al & ::au - Native tongue

::jp -Been studying Japanese for 5 years now, I'm very good at it! But theres always improvement :) I've also been to Japan :)

doctormalisimo
21st March 2011, 00:24
::en English - native language
::es Espanol - near fluent
::de Deutsch - did it for 5 years until GCSE but have forgotten a lot of it :(
::ru Русский -speak a little bit. hope to be fluent one day
::ie Gaelige - speak a little bit.

Jukica
21st March 2011, 00:43
Dunno if I've posted here, but will post again :lol:

::hr Native language (+ some dialects)
::en Fluent (I guess ...)
::de Learned it before, but forgot it ... since I don't use it
+ I know few words in some other languages
::rs ::ba I can understand them (well, they're similar :lol:)
::sl ::mk I can understand them, but a bit weaker
::bg ::pl I can understand them a bit

Milos-BC
21st March 2011, 11:47
::rs - I tried to learn it last year but quitted, but i'm confident that I will start again someday:)
(and yes, it was because of a Serbia's last year ESC entry:D)

If you need any help, just PM ;)

adnar
21st March 2011, 17:25
For me it's:

Polish - native one
English - very good both written and spoken.
German - I understand quite a lot, would have to refresh it to speak better
Spanish - Used to learn it, understand a lot, can't speak much
French - Can read it, understand a bit of it, but when it comes to speaking - it's a mess :(
Lithuanian - few words, some basic phrases

Quent91
21st March 2011, 22:29
::fr 10/10 - mother tongue.
::uk 8/10 - advanced (well, I think so :p) : I've been learning it for 4 years at school + 3 months in NY.
::nl 5/10 - average : I learned it at school and now I follow lessons in the evening.
::se 0.5/10 - extremely poor : I started to learn it on internet but I dropped out... I wish I could speak it fluently :(
::ru 0.5/10 - I can read the cyrillic alphabet, and only recognize some words close to French or English.

seb89
21st March 2011, 22:48
::nl 5/10 - average : I learned it at school and now I follow lessons in the evening.


Totally not true :p!!! It's much much much higher!!

Quent91
21st March 2011, 23:21
If you say so :oops:

vatroslav_cro
21st March 2011, 23:52
[QUOTE ::rs ::hr ::ba Serbo-Croatian fluently.

.[/QUOTE]

This one doesn't exist, my dear friend....get a real life:) I know it is hard sometimes:lol:

sannerz
22nd March 2011, 05:02
This one doesn't exist, my dear friend....get a real life:) I know it is hard sometimes:lol:

It might not exist for you, but the language I was taught is the language my parents were taught in Yugoslavia, therefore Serbo-Croatian. Although your closed-minded and nationalistic views might hinder you from understanding that.

Great way to get off topic too! Good job. ;)

vatroslav_cro
22nd March 2011, 10:23
It might not exist for you, but the language I was taught is the language my parents were taught in Yugoslavia, therefore Serbo-Croatian. Although your closed-minded and nationalistic views might hinder you from understanding that.

Great way to get off topic too! Good job. ;)

What? Who do you think you are? And you think you have the right to insult me this way? Talking to me such words and call me closed-minded and you don't even know me ??? Well, ok then.
Maybe the "language" you mention exists - for uneducated idiots only.

MyHeartIsYours
22nd March 2011, 12:08
^ What's the need for such way of speaking to people??

sannerz
22nd March 2011, 12:19
What? Who do you think you are? And you think you have the right to insult me this way? Talking to me such words and call me closed-minded and you don't even know me ??? Well, ok then.
Maybe the "language" you mention exists - for uneducated idiots only.

Everytime you've quoted one of my posts, you've insulted my opinions on this forum, I think I have enough proof to know what kind of person you are. But talking to you is nonsensical.

vatroslav_cro
22nd March 2011, 12:20
Me? I am sorry, but when it was? I don't even remember you here... And how did I insult you, do you have any proof???

Milos-BC
22nd March 2011, 12:36
Calm down both of you, there is no need for attacking each others. Stick to the topic about foreign languages. Thank you.

vatroslav_cro
22nd March 2011, 12:39
OK Milo. I accept your request, (although it wasn't me who started the quarrel) :)!
My apology to you:)

vatroslav_cro
22nd March 2011, 12:46
Sorry once again!
In this whole mess, I didn 't say what foreign languages I speak:mrgreen:



Croatian::hr (mother tongue);

English::us::uk(fluently);

German::de::at (understand many words and phrases, but not really good in speech);

Hungarian::hu (I learned it in my elementary school for three years, but now I can only understand a bit, it is a REALLY hard language, believe me:))



Of course I can completely understand all ex Yu languages and even a bit of Bulgarian, Slovakian, Czech...:lol:
(now I hope my colleage Sannerz will accept the way I said this and won't be angry with me anymore)? :).....

PeterLPZ
22nd March 2011, 15:55
I speak my mother tongue German ::de and I can speak the German dialect "Badisch" a little bit :lol:
In school I learnt ::us ::uk English and ::fr French
At the moment I try to learn ::hr Croatian and I enjoy it very much.
I can understand a little bit, but not speak, ::it Italian and ::nl dutch

Scooby
22nd March 2011, 17:50
It might not exist for you, but the language I was taught is the language my parents were taught in Yugoslavia, therefore Serbo-Croatian. Although your closed-minded and nationalistic views might hinder you from understanding that.

Great way to get off topic too! Good job. ;)

Completely agree with your attitude.
Generally, there are many similarities among all the Slavic languages and many phrases and words are similar (numbers, months, days etc etc).
The only biggest different between Serbian and Croatian is in alphabet. Serbs use cyrillic and Croats latin alphabet. And we have a few different words (grammars are almost equal). These are facts, all other is politic.

ESCFanUK
22nd March 2011, 18:57
::uk English: Fluent
::de German: Basic
::se Swedish: Basic (Would like to get the accent right)
::es Spanish: Very Basic
::fr French: Very Basic

Also know a few words of Welsh

nikolay_BG
25th March 2011, 14:03
Well I speak bulgarian fluent. That automatically makes me understand macedonian too :mrgreen:
I know some Serbian and I understand croatian too, because of that. Don`t know what the big difference is :twisted:
My grandfather is russian and he tought me some russian, but I never learned it so much :ugeek:

Because I am a slavic person I can also understand polish (a little), slovakian (only when written), czech(also only when written) and all other ex-yugoslav languages :)

In school I learned german (first foreign language), english (second foreign language) and french as third foreign language. But I don`t know anything in french :lol:

After school I started to learn finnish, but I gave up and now I go to greek language courses.

Sooooo that makes that I know :

::bg
::mk
::rs
::hr
::de
::uk
::fr
::fi
::gr

vatroslav_cro
25th March 2011, 18:18
Hehe Nikolay you are a polyglote then:) good! :)
Well the difference between Serbian and Croatian would be, let's say, like between Bulgarian and Macedonian.
(You don't speak Macedonian, but you can understand almost everything, as you said so)....I think I gave a good example.

shane23
25th March 2011, 18:55
Well i speek ::il hebrew and ::uk ::us fluently
in school i learned arabic and ::fr french
i know some ::es spanish as well... i just love to know new langueges.

Scooby
25th March 2011, 19:08
@ Nikolay

I can watch Bulgarian Tv without any problems, and understand almost everything.
And Serbian Televisions in many cases don't translate interwievs from bulgarian to serbian.

Israeliboy
26th March 2011, 10:31
Well i speek ::il hebrew and ::uk ::us fluently
in school i learned arabic and ::fr french
i know some ::es spanish as well... i just love to know new langueges.

The same with me :)

strupberry
26th March 2011, 15:05
i was sure i already wrote in this topic, but it seems i didn't.. ah well, maybe it was another forum :D

so, obviously ::sl (and like others, understanding ex-yu and other slavic languages on various levels, without the ability to actually form sentences myself)

i was taught ::uk in school, but i think i'm using ::us more nowadays, because of all tv shows i watch..

i had ::de and latin in high school for 4 years, sometimes i wish i'd work harder to get it to some useful level, german of course, can't really say that for latin

i also took courses of ::fr when i was younger and ::fi not too long ago - i still plan to use and improve this knowledge soon

Mark-ESC14
27th March 2011, 14:52
Fluent:

::nl Dutch: Of course, my mother tongue.
::uk English: I'm doing a TTO course, so I learn English very quickly and I'm fluent in it! :)

Basic

::de German: It is very similar to Dutch and easy to understand, although the grammar is more complicated. the German language has 3 definite articles (Dutch has 2) and they change depending on their function in a sentence, which doesn't happen in Dutch.

::fr French: At the moment I can understand, write and speak a bit French. But the French people talk very fast, so then it becomes more difficult :) But I will continue with learning French so hopefully I will be fluent as soon as possible!

Very Basic

::se Swedish: I'm quite interested in the Swedish language and I know some basic sentences and verbs. I can also count a bit. (Like, until 12 or so XD) Watching Melodifestivalen helps improve your Swedish ;)

EvNickGR
29th March 2011, 18:55
Greek and English! I want to learn Spanish and Italian too!!

Narmina
22nd April 2011, 07:07
::az Azerbaijani - Mother language

::ru Russian - Perfect (reading, writing, speaking, grammar)

::en English - Good (just have some problems in expressing long and difficult ideas :) )

::ua Ukrainian - Average (undesrtand but can't speak, though my father speaks fluently)

::tr Turkish - Average (understand, but can't speak too)

::es Spanish - Very Poor (know only basic expressions)

also tried to study ::il, but stoped after struding alphabet and some phrases :D

Drew
21st August 2011, 12:45
I speak:
::it Italian as a first language
::us American English: fluently
::de German: intermediate
::es Spanish: intermediate (but I understand 70-80%)
::ro Romanian: basic (and I understand more than I can speak)
::br Brazilian Portuguese: basic (but I can understand a lot)
::ru Russian: basic
::se Swedish: basic
+ basic Lombard dialect

I also know some words/phrases in:
::fr French (and I can understand a bit)
::az Azerbaijani
::pl Polish
::jp Japanese
::rs Serbo-Croatian
::fi Finnish
::nl Dutch (for I speak German, I can understand some Dutch too)

I also understand some ::no (Norwegian) and some ::dk (Danish) thanks to my basic Swedish.

How about you? :D

Leaf
21st August 2011, 12:54
There's not already a thread for this? :o

Well, whatever :p


I know
::ca English
::ca Canadian French

I tried to learn ::cz once but forgot it all :p

Leigh744
21st August 2011, 13:02
I know:

::au ::uk Australian/British English
::se Swedish (basic phrases)
::fr French (basic phrases)
::de German (basics + want to learn more)

+
Indonesian.

Kicker
21st August 2011, 13:17
::de German (First language)
::uk English (fluently)
::fr French (not fluently, but very good)
::es Spanish (Start to learn it - very sad story: My mother is from Spain and I spoke it when I was a little kid... then I came into the kindergarden and spoke just german and my mother spoke german with me then... And there is no spanish left :()

Mark-ESC14
21st August 2011, 14:15
Yes, there was already a thread for this somewhere. (Don't know where exactly)

I speak:

::nl Dutch, obviously my first language.

::uk English Fluently.

::fr French Intermediate, can already have small conversations.

::de German Intermediate, Dutch and German are very similar, but I speak French better than German. Hate the grammar. :l

::se Swedish Very Basic, Only some words, phrases and sentences.

MyHeartIsYours
21st August 2011, 14:29
::uk
English

And that's my lot, save for a few words in French lol.

Kicker
21st August 2011, 14:54
German Intermediate, Dutch and German are very similar, but I speak French better than German. Hate the grammar. :l



Nooo, it's very easy... I never had problems with it :lol:

Israeliboy
21st August 2011, 15:43
::il Hebrew - First language

::us English - Fluently

::es Spanish - intermediate

::fr French - Basic phrases

Arabic - 50% of speking, writing, reading

CC92
21st August 2011, 16:30
@ Drew

You are a genius. :D

::de German (native)
::en English (advanced)
::cn Mandarin (basics)


I also know some phrases in Estonian, French, Latin, Russian (+ alphabet) and Spanish, but that is far away from an acceptable conversation/actual language level. Reading Latin is okay though.

Drew
21st August 2011, 17:01
Hahaha I'm not a genius, I just love learning new languages in my spare time :)

Charly
21st August 2011, 19:10
::uk British - (Native)
::fr French - (Can Understand it but not speak it much even though i'am French Nationality)
::es Spanish - (I was speaking fluently while living in Spain but when I moved I have forgotten most of it :lol:)
::ma Moroccan (Cant Speak much can understand some of it and im also Moroccan Nationality)
::ua Ukrainian - (Leaned few words while went their for my medical operation in May :lol:)
::ro Romanian - (Been taught quite lots of words but know few from my Uncles friend)
::nl Dutch - (I know quite few words but learning new every few days) :D
::de German - (Been taught at school)
::jp Japanese - (Know quite few words :D)
::cn Chinese - (I have Chinese Blood and my French Grandma teached me few words especially bad words xrofl3)
Vietnamese & Cambodian - (She also know Vietnamese as my dad was born there and lived in both Vietnam and Cambodian)

Grinch
21st August 2011, 19:11
We already have a thread for this :)

Foreign languages (http://www.esctodayforum.com/showthread.php/4784-Foreign-languages)

r3gg13
21st August 2011, 20:47
::es Spanish (Start to learn it - very sad story: My mother is from Spain and I spoke it when I was a little kid... then I came into the kindergarden and spoke just german and my mother spoke german with me then... And there is no spanish left :()

I have a similar story, except with Japanese. I used to speak Japanese as a child, but now ZERO :lol:. Sad, but true

doctormalisimo
22nd August 2011, 01:06
::uk English - Native
::es Spanish - Almost fluent (but I've forgotten a lot of it over the summer :lol: )
::de German - I know a fair bit :)
::ru Russian - know a little
::ie Irish - know more of this than I think I do

r3gg13
22nd August 2011, 03:08
::ie Irish - know more of this than I think I do

Irish is one of the hardest language for me to wrap my head around. mh= v, fh= silent, and other alphabetic representation of sounds are quite hard for me to get used to! Grammar and structure can get confusing too!

Nikoreindeer1973
22nd August 2011, 13:00
Danish is my mother tongue.

I know some words in Russian, Serbian, Spanish and German.

And a big thanks to the Digiloo Trush.

evilperson
22nd August 2011, 19:29
I can speak English and Macedonian fluently.

I can also speak Serbian/Croatian however I have problems sometimes with conjugating words properly.
I have a light grasp of French. I can understand it more than I can speak it.

And a slew of words and phrases from other languages.

Mark-ESC14
22nd August 2011, 19:34
Nooo, it's very easy... I never had problems with it :lol:
What? How? You must have some talent for it that you were born with in order to speak German so well! :shock:

Sarcasm all over :D

Yamarus
25th August 2011, 14:02
::uk
English

And that's my lot, save for a few words in French lol.

Don't you speak Welsh too?

For my part, I speak English, Dutch and French fluently. French is my main native language, English is a secondary native language (my father speaks English and taught me).
I can understand and read Spanish quite easily, speaking and writing is more difficult.
I have a basic knowledge of German (although that might change in a few years, because I plan to take German in my Masters grade at uni, with language and literature classes).
I've also followed a six month university course on Afrikaans, a language closely related to Dutch. I can't pretend I would be able to speak it fluently though.
I'm about to start evening classes in Turkish, a language I really love and that I would really like to understand and read (speaking/writing would require a more significant personal investment which I'm not able to make at the moment).

I'm passionate about languages, and if I had the time, energy and brains to do it, I'd learn more at a time.

MyHeartIsYours
25th August 2011, 16:47
Don't you speak Welsh too?
I know bits (similar to what I know in French) but not good enough to describe myself as someone who can speak Welsh.

As for Spanish, after 2 years of lessons I only know about 2 words :|. Languages arent my thing as you can see :lol:.

doctormalisimo
25th August 2011, 17:29
Irish is one of the hardest language for me to wrap my head around. mh= v, fh= silent, and other alphabetic representation of sounds are quite hard for me to get used to! Grammar and structure can get confusing too!

Yep, the pronunciation is almost impossible :lol:
I know more spoken Irish than written Irish (ie I can say things but not spell them)

The grammar, structure and syntax are just hilarious. Irish turns simple sentences into works of art :p

r3gg13
25th August 2011, 23:26
Yep, the pronunciation is almost impossible :lol:
I know more spoken Irish than written Irish (ie I can say things but not spell them)

The grammar, structure and syntax are just hilarious. Irish turns simple sentences into works of art :p

Very much so! We always talked about the Irish language in my Sociolinguistics course!
I heard there's a revival movement regarding the usage of Irish language... in, of course, Ireland. How is that turning out?
I know that there were issues with usage of Welsh, even by Welsh people, in the UK. So I was wondering how it is in Ireland.

MyHeartIsYours
26th August 2011, 01:35
^ I know that in Northern Ireland the use of Irish is controversial because Nationalists are obviously supportive but Unionists not so much. At the election campaign this year, the Unionist parties used the language issue as a political campaign, saying that Sinn Fein wanted to waste money by giving Irish equal-status. There's also another language in Northern Ireland, Ulster Scots :).
Welsh is very much on the rebound, it's growing and growing from being on the verge of extinction. It's interesting how Wales has much less independent power, far fewer people and hasnt had independence for nearly a thousand years, and yet their own culture and language is much stronger than Scottish or Irish.

vatroslav_cro
26th August 2011, 11:30
::rs Serbo-Croatian
:D

Serbo Croatian? Hm....some members really need the additional education........

CPV4931
26th August 2011, 23:51
Almost all of you speak/have knowledges in 4 or more languages o0... I only speak German (as my mother langauge) and English (fluently). But I have some knowledge in Latin xD

sannerz
27th August 2011, 16:46
Serbo Croatian? Hm....some members really need the additional education........

You know how with English, there are various dialects? Like British English and American English? They pronounce words differently, have a few different words, but overall the two cultures can understand each other? That's all one language, correct? Same goes for Canadians, Australians, South Africans...

Well, with Serbia, Croatia, and Bosnia, all three use the same language with different dialects. Bosnians and Croats (as you should know) both say the "j" in their words, while Serbians don't. We have a few words that are different, sure, but we all understand each other when we talk to each other. I watch both HRTV and Pink TV, and I understand both of them perfectly. Because it's one language: Serbo-Croatian. Now, the dialects that come with it are Serbian and Croatian, and now Bosnian is starting to move its way up as its own dialect. It's the same concept. No need for additional education, just a different perspective.

seb89
27th August 2011, 18:29
Euhm I'll comment too ^^ :lol:. So you don't have the feeling Sannerz is spying on you xrofl3.

First of all, I don't know any of these languages.

But I know that "official certified interpreters/translators" in Belgium & the Netherlands are always certified for Serbo-Croatian. The test they take to obtain their certification are Serbo-Croatian test. This is an example from a certified translator/interpreter from the Netherlands (http://www.lidijapomper.nl/srpski/index.php). Of course I don't speak it, so I don't know all the differences, but I guess it would be mutual intelligble otherwise they wouldn't create one test for two totally different languages.

vatroslav_cro
27th August 2011, 18:34
Well it means that the Europeans are very hard to accept the reality and changes here....nothing really surprising. And that's one of the reasons why Europe is close to the collapse....in moral way I mean... because everybody means that he / she is the smartest one....

But... my language is Croatian and it will become the 24th official language of the European Union in less than two years! So this fact will be accepted sooner or later.

doctormalisimo
27th August 2011, 18:43
Very much so! We always talked about the Irish language in my Sociolinguistics course!
I heard there's a revival movement regarding the usage of Irish language... in, of course, Ireland. How is that turning out?
I know that there were issues with usage of Welsh, even by Welsh people, in the UK. So I was wondering how it is in Ireland.


Yeah, the use of Irish is increasing because of government initiatives and whatnot. It's the first official language of the country (TD's (Members of the Irish Parliament) usually give speeches and motions in both languages. It's also an official language of the EU. A lot of people CAN speak it, but I'm not sure how many of them choose to...


^ I know that in Northern Ireland the use of Irish is controversial because Nationalists are obviously supportive but Unionists not so much. At the election campaign this year, the Unionist parties used the language issue as a political campaign, saying that Sinn Fein wanted to waste money by giving Irish equal-status. There's also another language in Northern Ireland, Ulster Scots :).

I'm not sure Unionists have that view about Irish. I think most of them acknowledge it as a bona fide language. Ulster Scots on the other hand is a joke. It's not a language. It's just English in a thick Antrim accent. Unionists just made it up so they could divert some money from Irish language programmes.

r3gg13
27th August 2011, 19:29
But I know that "official certified interpreters/translators" in Belgium & the Netherlands are always certified for Serbo-Croatian. The test they take to obtain their certification are Serbo-Croatian test. This is an example from a certified translator/interpreter from the Netherlands (http://www.lidijapomper.nl/srpski/index.php). Of course I don't speak it, so I don't know all the differences, but I guess it would be mutual intelligble otherwise they wouldn't create one test for two totally different languages.
xgood

In linguistic communities, it's generally regarded as Serbo-Croatian too. It's like the case with Romanian and Moldovan, those two languages are regarded as "Romanian" because they have a high level of mutual intelligibility when spoken.(regardless of what orthographies they use, etc.). The same goes for the Serbo-Croatian languages. Once these languages have diverged enough that there are only less than 65% mutual ineligibility, then they could be classified as independent languages in linguistic sense.

Still, where the "Croatian", "Serbian", "Moldovan" and "Romanian" arises is in the political stage. When nations try to distinguish themselves culturally, historically, language-wise. It's like saying that this language is named xxxx-ian/xxxx-ese because it's spoken by xxxx group of people. That's perfectly fine in a political sense, but not in linguistic sense.

Yamarus
27th August 2011, 19:46
Well it means that the Europeans are very hard to accept the reality and changes here....nothing really surprising. And that's one of the reasons why Europe is close to the collapse....in moral way I mean... because everybody means that he / she is the smartest one....

I wouldn't go as far as that, but, as a linguist, I find this controversy you brought up very interesting. When do two languages that are (very) closely related to each other stop being considered as one?

Quebequois French, African French and Continental French are noticeably different, both in pronunciation and vocabulary, yet they are still considered as the same language. The same holds true for the numerous variants of English, even though I'm not sure Nigerian English is that similar to Australian English.

An example where two variants of one language ultimately became undeniably distinct languages is Dutch (Netherlands) and South African Dutch (which became Afrikaans). Mutual intellegibility is still significant, but both the spelling and pronunciation is different. Interestingly, the same might have happened between Dutch (Netherlands) and Flemish if the 1841 Flemish Language Convention hadn't decided on linguistic unity with the North.

The key here is spelling. Written English is pretty much the same in Britain, Nigeria and New Zealand, or differences are negligible (American English "z" instead of "s" in "ise" doesn't prevent mutual intellegibility). The same holds true for French, whose (in)famously powerful Acadmie franaise wields considerable influence on all Francophone countries.
On the other hand, the Dutch have never been very intent on imposing their language on their colonies. Indonesia was a Dutch colony, for example, but the local population was never taught Dutch. As for South Africa, loss of influence (political and economic decline) and the relatively limited cultural influence of the Dutch language is sure to have prevented linguistic unity. If Flanders had decided on a different language than the Netherlands, the influence of Dutch might have been even more limited.

So why would a single language come to split? There are many factors, but political, economical and geographical reasons are most relevant to point out. A good indication that a language has really split in two is when the spelling features significant variations; to the point of non-intellegibility.

r3gg13
27th August 2011, 20:05
^Very well said Yamarus :)

seb89
27th August 2011, 20:10
Very well said both of you :D.

Reminds of my linguistics courses at uni :D.

vatroslav_cro
27th August 2011, 21:15
Well ok...you can think whatever you want....maybe you know better than me what language I speak to.....hahah.....very interesting...I can't believe!:twisted:
Thank you so much for "respecting" me, and my language!:shock:
Indeed.

seb89
27th August 2011, 21:37
It's not about "not having respect".

They just stated scientific facts by researchers. Read a scientific book about linguistics and you'll know what they are talking about. Cause what R3gg13 & Yamarus said is true and scientificly proven.

Prove you are right with scientific material.

Yamarus
27th August 2011, 22:14
Well ok...you can think whatever you want....maybe you know better than me what language I speak to.....hahah.....very interesting...I can't believe!:twisted:
Thank you so much for "respecting" me, and my language!:shock:
Indeed.

Maybe you read my post wrong, but I never implied anything about your own language. As far as I'm concerned, I cannot comment on Serbian/Croatian because I know little about that issue. I merely wanted to add what I did know to the debate.

Quent91
27th August 2011, 22:53
I'd like to learn russian :)

doctormalisimo
27th August 2011, 23:19
I'd like to learn russian :)

I'm going to enrol to do it at university :)

vatroslav_cro
28th August 2011, 11:28
Croatian language is not same like Serbian, Bosnian and Montenegrin language, indeed.
In addition to its standard language, Croatia is rich in dialects originating from the Chakavian (Čakavski), Kajkavian (Kajkavski) and Shtokavian (Štokavski) vernacular. Bosnian, Serbian and Montenegrin don' t have that dialects. Croatian is a Slavic language, belongin to the South Slavic, Western subgroup of the Slavic breanch of Indo-European family, however, like other Slavic languages it developed from Old Slavic. The basis for Croatian standard language is Shtokavian and Ijekavian dialect. Of course, it is mutually inteligible with Serbian, Bosnian and Motenegrin.
It can be considered that Kajkavian dialect is mainly spoken in the western and northwestern parts of the country, Chakavian in Dalmatia, partly in Histrian peninsula and Gorski kotar (region between Rijeka and Karlovac), and Shtokavian in Slavonia and Lika (eastern and central parts of Croatia). But it is not always strict rule, because in many ways that three dialects are mixed (especially in rural areas, where almost every village has „its own dialect“).
The Croatian written language heritage goes back to the end of the 11th century. The oldest Croatian textst were written in kind of Croatian cersion of Church Slavonic and archaic Chakavian, exclusively in Glagolitic script (Glagoljica). Bartol Kasic, a Jesuit from the Island of Pag, wrote the first grammar of the Croatian language, in Latin, entitled Institutionum linguae Illyricae (The basics of the Illyrian language). This grammar, printed in 1604. In Rome, influenced nearly all Croatian grammar books written by the first half of the 19th century. The beginnings of the standardisation of today's Croatian go back to the 18th century, and at the end of the 19th century the foundations of current standard Croatian were set. Over 5,5 million people today use Croatian as their mother tongue.

(SOME HISTORICAL FACTS ABOUT CROATIAN LANGUAGE)

Nikoreindeer1973
28th August 2011, 11:55
I want to learn some more Russian too.

Salmon
18th September 2011, 15:09
I can:

Speak German, English and the Serbocroatian languages fluently,
Read and understand Latin :lol:,
and I'm about to learn French.

Not much :D

vatroslav_cro
18th September 2011, 15:13
Serbocroatian languages
Oh no not again:( God why?

Quent91
19th September 2011, 00:12
What's going on with Serbocroatian ? :?

sannerz
19th September 2011, 04:24
:lol:

vatroslav_cro
19th September 2011, 12:35
Sannerz* what is so funny?
Quent91* I think I explained well before what am I thinking about (see some previous posts):)

sannerz
19th September 2011, 12:40
Please don't start again. :lol:

vatroslav_cro
19th September 2011, 12:44
Me? I am not starting anything.

Scooby
19th September 2011, 18:09
:lol::lol::lol:

MyHeartIsYours
20th September 2011, 15:25
Im now in the heartland of Welsh speaking territory :D. In Bangor, Welsh is actually the first language of the majority, it is only when students arrive it decreases to 46% :p. It is strange when you hear people out-and-about, they're all talking Welsh and not English. And at the University, everything is said first of all in Welsh, so as you can imagine, an meeting which would normally take 30 mins, takes like an hour! I love it though, it sounds really beautiful. They say we're expected to learn words like please, thank you, etc in Welsh, so far I've picked up 'ddiolch' from the shop, which means thanks (I hope! :lol:) :D.

Stargazer
20th September 2011, 16:54
Languages I speak
::se Native speaker
::us Fluently
::es Intermediate
::de Intermediate reading, Basic writing/speaking
::is Intermediate reading/speaking, Basic writing


Languages I don't speak
::no Fluent reading, Intermediate listening
::dk Fluent reading, Basic listening
::nl Intermediate reading, Basic listenng
::fr Basic reading
::it Basic reading/listening
::pt Basic reading

nala
21st September 2011, 15:16
I speak Spanish and Galician(because im from Galicia, in the north of Spain) and since Galician is similar to portuguese i can understad portuguese pretty well(at least written, spoken is more difficult depending on the accent).
And i can read and understand some english, and speak but not very well.

Gandan
30th September 2011, 03:38
Languages I speak


::it Mothertongue
::uk Intermediate reading, basic writing/speaking XD
::es Intermediate reading, speaking and writing

I understand without particular problems:

::fr


Languages I'm going to study

::se


Languages I'd like to study
::mt
::gr


I've studied but I don't remember XD:

Chinese
::jp

sannerz
30th September 2011, 18:47
This is a thread about which foreign languages we speak, not the disputed origins of languages.

MyHeartIsYours
30th September 2011, 19:10
Exactly, and languages come from many origins, English is a prime example of this, not just one place but a blend of old/current languages from a variety of places.

Yamarus
6th October 2011, 11:10
I've started Turkish evening classes! I'm excited, I love Turkish :-D

Magikk
6th October 2011, 13:58
I am amazed at how many languages some of you can speak.

r3gg13
7th October 2011, 03:01
I'm studying Croatian/Serbian/Montenegrin/Bosnian grammar for my syntax class :)

I wish I could actually speak it :)

sannerz
7th October 2011, 05:28
I'm studying Croatian/Serbian/Montenegrin/Bosnian grammar for my syntax class :)

I wish I could actually speak it :)

I can help if you need it!
Well, I can help with Bosnian. Don't want anyone to get offended on here. :p

r3gg13
7th October 2011, 07:40
I can help if you need it!
Well, I can help with Bosnian. Don't want anyone to get offended on here. :p

Awesome :) lololol ;)

I just love rough and fancy it sounds at the same time. Those languages have this certain sexiness to it :)

vatroslav_cro
7th October 2011, 10:57
I can help with Croatian (:)) btw, on the topic "Let's learn some languages" in LANGUAGE THREADS, I described some grammar grounds of Croatian :P

r3gg13
7th October 2011, 17:00
^ Awesome :) Thanks :)

vatroslav_cro
7th October 2011, 17:22
No prob:) if you want to know anything else, just PM me, of course:)

Scooby
8th October 2011, 14:08
I'll help you with Serbo-Croatian :mrgreen:

sannerz
8th October 2011, 17:29
:lol:

Kryptonite
8th October 2011, 18:22
I'm studying Croatian/Serbian/Montenegrin/Bosnian grammar for my syntax class :)

I wish I could actually speak it :)

Wow, awesome. :D

When you'll learn how to talk Croatian/Serbian/Montenegrin/Bosnian, you'll understand Slovenian language too (at least partly). :p

Milos-BC
17th October 2011, 11:25
I am in the order to help with Serbo-Croatian as well, if needed :D

Tinchey
9th November 2011, 00:00
I speak:

::hr mother tongue
::en Since kindergarden/pre-school whatever you call it
::it have been studying for 12 years now.
::fr I completely understand it, and grammar isn't that bad
::rs ::ba ::me I know differences in vocabulary and grammar so it's not a problem


I understand:

::sl it's similar to kajkavski dialect I can understand it
::de I understand it and can read it without any extra studying, I've watched german channels a lot when I was younger. German pokemons FTW!
::cz ::sk when I was there I was able to speak and understand everything, I was pleasantly surprised.
::mk ::bg ::ru watched some tv shows and I could understand some phrases.
::es similar to italian, lots of soap operas, do think it is one of the easiest languages to learn

will study them on college:
::no ::dk ::se Can't wait!!! :D
And maybe even ::nl or ::ru

Would like to learn:
chinese
korean
::pt
::lt
arabic :D

seb89
9th November 2011, 00:02
Wohow, you speak a lot of languages :o!



And maybe even ::nl

Good luck if you would choose it :D!

Tinchey
9th November 2011, 00:10
Wohow, you speak a lot of languages :o!



Good luck if you would choose it :D!

Well most of them I can only understand. ;)
I love dutch, it's simply enchanting. :D

seb89
9th November 2011, 00:13
But still, it's a lot :o!

Really?? That's nice to hear :). I always find it really cool, if people want to learn Dutch :). But I guess, you'll understand some of it, cause you also understand German :D.

Tinchey
9th November 2011, 00:18
But still, it's a lot :o!

Really?? That's nice to hear :). I always find it really cool, if people want to learn Dutch :). But I guess, you'll understand some of it, cause you also understand German :D.

Yeah, it's like a mixture of english and german. :D

Kicker
9th November 2011, 18:46
I can tell you: When you understand and speak german, you can at least understand written dutch :)

Quent91
9th November 2011, 21:58
::fr I completely understand it, and grammar isn't that bad

So nice !! :o :o

I thought all the non-french speakers found it very hard and rude to learn (especially about the grammar, actually) :)

r3gg13
10th November 2011, 03:04
I thought all the non-french speakers found it very hard and rude to learn (especially about the grammar, actually) :)

I actually find French grammar more logical than English grammar, at least there are less exceptions and French grammar just make a lot of sense (at least for me).

seb89
10th November 2011, 03:47
I can tell you: When you understand and speak german, you can at least understand written dutch :)

And vice versa :D!

sannerz
10th November 2011, 04:08
Learning Latin helps with a lot of other grammar systems in languages, especially with the Romance Languages(obviously). :)

Kicker
10th November 2011, 17:15
I actually find French grammar more logical than English grammar, at least there are less exceptions and French grammar just make a lot of sense (at least for me).

I don't think so. The english grammar is much more logical and consequent. That is a little problem in french: For every rule there is a exception or they just don't use their rules in every case.
But what I am talking, german is worse of course :lol:

seb89
10th November 2011, 18:11
I agree with Reggie though. But French is also very tricky with it's subjunctive and tenses. French grammar has a rule, but every rule has exceptions and those exceptions have also exceptions lol. I like that hahaha! And German is the most logical one of the three imo :).

MyHeartIsYours
10th November 2011, 18:20
I always struggled with languages hence why Im so bad at them, but I have always found French to be more understandable that Spanish (the other one I had lessons in) or German (which I have tried to pick up a bit myself). That could be because I had more intensive learning in French though...

r3gg13
11th November 2011, 04:59
I agree with Reggie though. But French is also very tricky with it's subjunctive and tenses. French grammar has a rule, but every rule has exceptions and those exceptions have also exceptions lol. I like that hahaha! And German is the most logical one of the three imo :).

When to use subjunctive in French and what tense to use in "si clauses" could be super confusing! I still love French though, it's my love xheart

What I've heard from German that confuses my friends taking German is the word order in embedded clauses how you have the verb last instead of the second position!

seb89
11th November 2011, 14:46
When to use subjunctive in French and what tense to use in "si clauses" could be super confusing! I still love French though, it's my love xheart

What I've heard from German that confuses my friends taking German is the word order in embedded clauses how you have the verb last instead of the second position!

French is my first love and that since 1999 xrofl3! I love just love that language :D.

What you say about German about the verb last instead of the second position, is the same in Dutch actually =). I guess that's why I find the grammar quite logical (I don't say it's easy though), but the basics is pretty much the same.

MyHeartIsYours
11th November 2011, 15:15
Just curious, is French your native language, Senne? Or is it Dutch? :)

seb89
11th November 2011, 15:56
Just curious, is French your native language, Senne? Or is it Dutch? :)

No, French is not my native language, it's Dutch :D.

nikolay_BG
11th November 2011, 18:21
What I've heard from German that confuses my friends taking German is the word order in embedded clauses how you have the verb last instead of the second position!

Welcome to my world. That`s what ever confused me in german, cause the bulgarian word order is similar to the english one and the german word order is completely different so it took me, like totally, an year to get used to it.

Kicker
11th November 2011, 20:14
In German you can change the word order :lol:
Example: "Ich werde morgen essen gehen." "Morgen werde ich Essen gehen." "Essen gehen werde ich morgen."
(Nobody would say "Essen gehen werde ich morgen.", but you could say it.)

Stargazer
11th November 2011, 20:57
Right, but you still have the verbs in the reverse order. In the English word order (and Swedish as well) it would be gehen essen.

markowymarek
5th December 2011, 14:41
Hi! ;)

I'm from Poland, so ::pl polish is my native

::uk my english is on intermediate level
::ru also I can speak russian (basic level)

I want to learn: ::es spanish and maybe ::ua ukrainian

also I like ::ee estonian and ::ro romanian, but I don't think about learning them

dezbee2008
20th March 2012, 20:13
English I know by heart because that's my native language (I had fluency problems as a child, though)
Spanish I know mostly by heart, but don't speak it (been trying to speak and write it). Same goes for French.
Italian and Portuguese I somewhat know.
Only one phrase in Russian.

The rest I don't know or understand.

Yoni
21st March 2012, 19:15
Hebrew ::il - Native
Russian ::ru - Well I used to speak it a lot when i was 3, and lets just say my vocabulary kind of stayed the same :lol:
English ::uk - Fluent :D
Arabic ::sy (I'd use the Egyptian icon if there was one :P) Learned it for 3 years in school, very basic vocabulary :P

Unfortunately in my school (and most schools in Israel) they don't teach a lot of languages :(

MyHeartIsYours
22nd March 2012, 21:18
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=v-en-iDeZEE#!
This is funny, he's pretty good at it too! :D

ParadiseES
22nd March 2012, 21:30
hahahaha this is funny :lol:

To me almost all the American accents sound the same though...... He did the European ones perfect! LOL at the Spanish one :lol:
Sounds between cute and pathetic..... I don't speak like that though... :p

MyHeartIsYours
22nd March 2012, 21:38
When I hear Americans, they just tend to sound all the same to me, apart from the southern one, cuz that is very distinctive. But when I hear it like that, you really can tell the difference between all the different ones!
The Chinese ones are real funny to me, it's what I hear in this flat all the time :lol:. Russian he does so well too! His Spanish one was good but he did make it sound too Anglicanised :lol:

Charly
22nd March 2012, 21:40
::uk British English (Manchester Accent)
::es Iberian Spanish (Malag/Costa Del Sol Accent - can even do the proper Spanish accnt :D0
::nl Dutch (A True Dutcman Accent)
::ua Basic Ukrainian
::ro Basic Romanian
::ma Few words in Arabic (Moroccan Dialect)
::fr French (Nice Accent)
::de German few words
::it Italian Few words
::tr Turkish few words

MyHeartIsYours
22nd March 2012, 21:44
I wonder who has the stronger Manc accent, Charly, me or you? :twisted: I've only realised how very strong mine is since going to Uni :lol:

ParadiseES
22nd March 2012, 22:13
@Charlyje
Can you explain what's the proper Spanish accent? :lol:
I think Spanish accent doesn't exist. Spaniards speak very different depending where they are from... Imagine between different Spanish speaking countries... :lol:

@Adam
I think he did it quite well, but it was very short to have an impression... Anyway, it's not a big deal. I think it's not really an accent but most people pronounce English as they were speaking Spanish :lol:
But still I don't speak like that! I should talk to you once and you tell me about my accent :p

Charly
22nd March 2012, 22:52
TBH in all my time living in Spaini have never talked to someone coming from the north or etc :lol: only heard Andalucians speak :o

Isnt the proper Spanish accent is different a bit to Mexican and Uruguayan etc? :3

Adam, your on! :p

seb89
22nd March 2012, 22:53
Omg Charlyje, you speak like a Dutchman :o! I can't even do that :lol:!

Charly
22nd March 2012, 22:56
Omg Charlyje, you speak like a Dutchman :o! I can't even do that :lol:!

It so hard :lol: I tried to sing Boudewijn De Groot - Land Van Maas En Waal - and is so hard to keep up :lol:

seb89
22nd March 2012, 22:59
It so hard :lol: I tried to sing Boudewijn De Groot - Land Van Maas En Waal - and is so hard to keep up :lol:

:lol:! I know! I can speak a bit like the Dutch, but my 'r' spoils it xrofl3. I can only pronounce the French 'r'.

You should try to sing Kraantje Pappie - Waar is Kraan :p!

ParadiseES
22nd March 2012, 23:41
TBH in all my time living in Spaini have never talked to someone coming from the north or etc :lol: only heard Andalucians speak :o

Isnt the proper Spanish accent is different a bit to Mexican and Uruguayan etc? :3

Adam, your on! :p

Then if you understand Andalucians, you wouldn't have any problem with any other! :lol:

I don't like talking about "proper" Spanish. Everyone speaks it in his way ;)
But that "proper" Spanish is the one from Valladolid and the centre-north area, (Castille). It's sort of neutral Spanish.

Charly
23rd March 2012, 01:09
Ah I see :P

Roxygirl354
24th March 2012, 23:38
Well I speak:
Italian(My first lenguage, I was born in Italy)
English
Spanish
German
French
and I'm learning Japanese.
I can speak, write and understand all of them.

MyStar
25th March 2012, 04:56
My first language is English. I speak Czech pretty well these days as I am a Postgraduate student in the language. I also speak a little bit of Hungarian.

wyq614
31st March 2012, 06:50
My mother language is Chinese, and I can speak English and Spanish as well.
I can also greet in some European languages.

nofuxCZ
8th April 2012, 19:25
I speak Czech pretty well these days as I am a Postgraduate student in the language.
Awesome xcheers

::cz - Native
::sk - Fluent :mrgreen:
::uk - Good
::fr - 4 years of studies, but I forgot almost everything. I can still understand a bit though.
::de::es - Basics
::pl - Can understand ~65-70% when spoken slowly, ~80% written
::sl ::hr ::rs - Can understand some phrases

amateur
8th April 2012, 20:32
::tr - Native
::en - Fluent
::az - Good
::tm - Basic~Intermediate
::de - Can understand some very basic sentences/words

Ewigkeit
8th April 2012, 21:49
::tr Native.
::en Not bad.
::az Understand very well, but not so good at speaking and writing.
::de Basically.
::gr Basic phrases.
::fr Only tried to learn.

I also think that I know loads of words in different languages. But, I only know them I am not qualified enough to make proper sentences with them. :p

FrachellyJelly
8th April 2012, 23:05
::en native
::fr studied on and off for 6/7 years. Can read it, but lack the confidence in it so am not as good as I could be speaking/writing it
::de studied it for 3 years. Wouldn't say intermediate, but not basic either.

Okay, so I can't seem to find a WELSH flag :O but I live in a majority Welsh speaking area of the UK so I know a little - speaking it and understanding it, but I can't read and write it at all really!

Jukica
9th April 2012, 17:01
Some of you know a lot of languages xcheer

handeyener
10th April 2012, 02:07
::es native
::uk fluent
::ru intermediate
::ro intermediate
::bg basic
::pt basic (i can understand it written, but i have trouble when pronouncing it)
Korean (i studied it for 2 years, but still my knowledge is basic)

Oh and by the way i can help anyone to learn spanish, just PM me and i can add you at facebook or share some materials.

Kicker
10th April 2012, 10:56
Oh and by the way i can help anyone to learn spanish, just PM me and i can add you at facebook or share some materials.

If anybody would like to have some help in German, they can PM me too ;)

At the Moment, I'm still trying to learn turkish but everytime when I start I don't go on and then I forget everything again... ^^

Insomnia
13th April 2012, 19:51
::be / ::nl == I'm Belgian/ Flemish, so Dutch-speaking

::fr == Seeing as I live in Belgium, I learned to speak French (and it's like wine, the more years pass by, the more fluently I can speak French)

::uk == English > my mom LOOOVES soaps on ITV/BBC (Coronation Street, Emmerdale, Eastenders, ...). We always watched (all my life) with English subtitles, so my English is quite fluent too.

::it == I just visited Rome. I actually didn't speak a word of Italian (well, maybe 4 of 5), but with a small dictionary I did my best to speak as much Italian as I could (in bars, on trains, in shops, even to hobos ...). You could really see that the locals really appreciated that :) At the end of the week I didn't speak it fluently (because, well, of course it's impossible), but I needed the dictionary a lot less.

MyHeartIsYours
14th April 2012, 01:05
^ Yaay, Emmerdale's AWESOME, glad it came in handy for learning English too! :D

Charly
16th April 2012, 05:26
^ Yaay, Emmerdale's AWESOME, glad it came in handy for learning English too! :D

Oh god, not Emmerdale :/

Every time I'm watching TV Emmerdale, Eastenders, Coronation Street comes on I get kicked off by my sis or mum :lol:

They made miss the WTCC Marrakech Grand Prix this Evening which was very important oOX

In other words im starting to learn a bit of Japenese :p

MyHeartIsYours
16th April 2012, 20:52
We need to get you to get Emmerdale fever too Charly! :D

Charly
17th April 2012, 16:45
Never!

Insomnia
18th April 2012, 15:34
Go on Charlyje ... give it a shot :D

Charly
18th April 2012, 16:19
Never in a million years ;)

Enry
8th May 2012, 14:22
::it I speak everyday Italian because I live in Italy :D
::uk I study English in school, but I don't speak it very well
::fr Also I study French in school, but I can't speak it well
::es I can speak only some words, for example "hasta la vista" :lol:
And I speak Italian dialects :lol:

Spencre
8th May 2012, 15:37
::al Native, i was born in Albania
::fr Fluent, i left my country when i was 10 years old for France, now i'm 22.
::uk School level (college+high school), i have validated my TOEIC this year, i went in Ireland during 3 weeks for this.

+
::es I have studied spanish in school, in college only, now i think i have forget all my lessons.

Anca
29th May 2012, 13:12
::ro native
::it I understand basic conversations but I can't speak it
::fr I learn french since 5th grade, still I'm not good at it.
::es I understand it but I can't speak. :(
And with english, the internet is helping me more than my teacher. I'm sorry to say that.

daniels1000
29th May 2012, 13:59
::hr native ( ::rs and ::ba are similar )
::uk fluent. I know it very well.Write,understand,speak.I have learned it since 1st grade,so that's a lot :)
::it intermediate
::sl basic-intermediate understand it , but I don't know to speak it very well(I know a lot of words,but don't know well how to connect them in sentences )

I also know some words from ::fr , ::ru , ::bg , ::es , ::de

Logichno
30th May 2012, 00:06
::ba mother tongue
::uk fluent
::dk not as good as ::uk and never will be with all those vocals that sound the same to me :( , ::no can read well but don't understand when they speak

learnt also ::fr in high school, but remember only couple of sentences, since I've never used it in life

Celia
2nd June 2012, 21:03
::es native
::uk ::fr fluent
::de basic

I'd love to learn a Slavic language too.

theCONWEL
3rd June 2012, 20:26
::en Native Language
::fr Fluent-ish, been learning since I was 7
::it::es::se::no A few words are understood, If I was given something to say I could probably do it though

AdelAdel
3rd June 2012, 20:45
::pl - native
::us - advanced
::en - Although I do understand what RP speakers are saying (not if too fast) there's no way I can speak in it.
::sy - learning...

In the past I tried ::se and ::de, but failed in the long run

nekoisneko
17th June 2012, 17:35
::id - native
::id Sundanese - native (one of Indonesian Traditional Language)
::us - advanced
::de - ein bischen
::jp - learnt it for almost 2 years, still can't read kanji
::kr - only can read those han guk alphabet
::es - very basic

now i'm trying to learn Skandinavian Language (::is, ::no, ::se, or ::fi)

tuorem
25th June 2012, 16:17
As a lover of European languages:

-::fr My native language
-::uk I think I'm pretty good at speaking it, but I still do not master it
-::es I'm quite good at it as well, even though I need more trips to Spain to gain fluency
-::it I've studied it for five years now, I know the grammar but not enough vocabulary so I couldn't hold a conversation.
-::no I tried to learn it on my own, I've just some basic knowledge since I didn't find enough time to improve it.
-::pl I didn't even try, but it's the next language I'd like to learn, sounds beautiful.

Sultana
1st July 2012, 02:44
I'm fluent in Russian, English
I can understand Bulgarian , Greek ( little bit) and other Slavic languages there is no problem for me except ukranian and byelorussian . :)
I can speek as a tourist : Spanish and French
and of course i can speek my native language

DannyDS
19th August 2012, 01:18
I speak:

::be Flemish
::be/::fr French
::cl Spanish
::us English
::de German

I wanna learn Korean & Romanian soon. :)

CC92
24th August 2012, 00:03
Currently I am studying Russian so up-dated it should be:

::de German
::en English
::it Latin
::tw Chinese
::ru Russian

Though out of these only my German and to a lesser degree English skills are actually useful. I will try to improve my English and Russian but shall never touch the two others even with a ten foot pole ever again.

Jim
24th August 2012, 00:27
My mother language is ::gr GREEK
I also speak ::uk ENGLISH
I want to learn in future ::de GERMAN, ::it ITALIAN, ::es SPANISH or maybe ::tr TURKISH ? I don't know which one to choose...It's so difficult! OK, I can't learn them all, so I have to choose one or maybe two at maximum!

Little
25th August 2012, 23:27
My mother language is italian, but I know also english, french and... my dialect! :p

VasilijeM
25th August 2012, 23:36
::rs - Native
::uk - Can understand and write very well, but I can't speak it very fluent-ish (yet)
::hr - Can understand and speak
::de - Learning
I want to learn ::fr ::dk and ::kr. :mrgreen:

CypriotGirl
10th September 2012, 15:11
I don't remember if I replied in this thread! So I'll post now!

I speak:

::cy Cypriot Greek - Native
::gr Greek - Native
::uk English - I speak it almost fluently with good accent, but I sometimes do grammar errors, and while writting it I have some problems too!
::bg Bulgarian - Basic, I had some lessons, and I can speak it better than I can understand it.
::es Spanish - Basic, I never had lessons to learn it, what I know is from Spanish songs and some research through the internet!

I understand:

::mk - Very similar to Bulgarian, when I listen to ::mk songs, I understand about the half things!
::rs::hr::ba - I understand some phrases, probably 20% of a song.
::ru - Like the ones above^^
::it - Similar to Spanish, and some words are internationally used, so I understand few things. I had also lessons in Italian, but I forgot most things!
::pt - Same as my understanding in Italian, but I understand fewer things.
::tr - Only some phrases, especially these that we use in Cyprus too, but no way to understand what is somebody talking about!
::fr - I had lessons, not once but twice (in high school for 4 years, and then I repeated them in college), but the only thing I can do is to understand few things!
::de - Very very few things, only words that are similar to English, or I remember them from the lessons I had in college!

AdelAdel
10th September 2012, 15:38
What is the difference between Cypriot Greek and regular Greek?

CypriotGirl
10th September 2012, 23:10
What is the difference between Cypriot Greek and regular Greek?

Cypriot Greek is not an official language. In tv (the news, advertisments etc), the regular Greek is used, and in school we learn the regular Greek, newspapers, magazines etc, are all in Greek, but the language we speak every day is different from the one we learn in school. People from Greece say that they don't understand us when we talk! We have a lot of words that are of Latin, Turkish, ancient French, English and Arabic origin, and some sounds that do not exist in regular Greek, some sounds like these (I use some Serbian latin letters): đ, č, d, ...

Check here, I posted some videos of a Cypriot guy talking: http://www.escforums.com/t6021-9/#post838603

Jim
10th September 2012, 23:25
Yes, CypriotGirl has right. Here in Greece the most times it's so difficult to understand what a Cypriot says. And of course I have personal experience. Many times I had beside me Cypriots and Ι hadn't noticed that they are Cypriots. I was saying myself that maybe they are from Spain or Latin America and I don't know from where. I said Spain or Latin America because many Cypriots have dark skin because Cyprus is so sunny. And yes sometimes, sorry for that CypriotGirl, but I laugh so much when a Cypriot talks, Cypriot Greek sound a little funny although is cute! Oi panaia mu! :)

CypriotGirl
10th September 2012, 23:44
Yes, CypriotGirl has right. Here in Greece the most times it's so difficult to understand what a Cypriot says. And of course I have personal experience. Many times I had beside me Cypriots and Ι hadn't noticed that they are Cypriots. I was saying myself that maybe they are from Spain or Latin America and I don't know from where. I said Spain or Latin America because many Cypriots have dark skin because Cyprus is so sunny. And yes sometimes, sorry for that CypriotGirl, but I laugh so much when a Cypriot talks, Cypriot Greek sound a little funny although is cute! Oi panaia mu! :)

My relatives when they went abroad, they were always mistaken for Italians while they were talking (one reason is that they are from Paphos, and Paphians have a melodic way of talking, like the Italians)!

I have heard that people from Rhodes are always being mistaken for Cypriots when they go to mainland Greece, because they speak very similar with us! Many say that Cretan dialect is similar to Cypriot, but I don't think so. I understand some Cretan, but Cretan sound like Greek with Portuguese accent to me, and many words they use are unknown to me! :lol:

CypriotGirl
10th September 2012, 23:46
Btw, the only song from ESC NF that was in Cypriot was that tragedy from 1991:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGXoFxCpGgY

xrofl2

seb89
12th September 2012, 00:18
So Cypriot Greek is like a dialect of Greek or really a separate language?

Jim
12th September 2012, 00:28
It's a dialect of Greek of course!

Verjamem
6th April 2013, 18:23
Hmmm, me and languages ;)
::pl Polish - Of course fluent. I understand many of dialects (rather all, but I am not sure).
::en English - I started to studying English, when I was 7 years old. My grammar is quite poor, but I can write, speak and understand without serious problems.
::de German - I started to studying German, when I was 12 years old. I can't write, speak and I am not able to understand anything. I only know somewhat of vocabulary.
::ru Russian - This is year, I will graduate. I hope, I will have this language in my next school. Cyrillic maybe is some hard to teach, but nothing horrible.
::dk Danish/::se Swedish - I want to move to another country in future, so learning a language will be essential.

toinou03
6th April 2013, 18:50
As for me...

My mother language is ::fr French
I speak ::en English and ::es Spanish... Well I understand Spanish well but it's hard for me to speak with Spaniards because they talk too fast ! :lol:
I'm also a teacher of ancient languages, latin and ancient greek so I can understand a little ::it Italian...
I tried to learn ::gr Greek but I give up quite quickly ! So I just can say "Pou einai to xenodocheio ?" and that kind of things only ! :lol:

I want to learn ::de German because I have several German friends and I love to go to Berlin. I want also to learn a little ::nl Dutch because my region is filling with Dutch people and they are all awesome ! :) I have many Dutch pupils at school, they are very nice, but sometimes, I lack Dutch vocabulary to teach them to speak French. I would like to know also ::ee Estonian because they rule as a country and I would like to go there... And then I dream to speak a little ::ru Russian to cope with Tolstoi, Dostoievski, Czechov and all their friends ! :D

EscTurkey
6th April 2013, 21:49
It is so nice to see many multilingual people here. :)
I speak only
::tr My city is in northern Turkey which is called "the region of Black Sea" and our accent is quite different from formal Turkish, and I speak both.
::uk I'd like to say I'm a fluent speaker but I'd rather stay humble and say "almost fluent" :)
::de I've been learning this at school for 3 years but my friends hate it and always disrupt the class, so I haven't learnt much [I can make basic sentences but I lack vocabular skills :( ].

I can understand ::az but can't speak very well.
I understand the other Turkic languages (Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Kazakh etc) more thoroughly than a random Turk cuz I hear their songs and study the languages online.

I want to learn:
::il , Arabic, ::jp, ::hu, ::ee, ::fi

Jim
6th April 2013, 22:16
My mother tongue is ::gr Greek!
I speak almost fluently ::uk English!
I studied ::de German for 3 years in school but I don't know it at all! :lol:
If I would had the chance, I would really like to learn ::de German, ::it Italian or ::es Spanish! :)

r3gg13
7th April 2013, 01:03
I can say that I speak 2 languages in native level

::us English - I can read/write/speak it. English is my dominant language. I speak with a California accent. I say "like" like there's no tomorrow. More or less like how Hannah Mancini speaks English.
::ph Tagalog - I can read/write/speak it. Out of the 6 dialects of Tagalog, I speak 1 (the Standard Manila dialect, also known as Filipino) and understand 5. The 6th one is just too different. (The difference between the dialects is similar to the difference that exist between the Serbo-Croatian language continuum, Macedonian and Slovenian).

I say I speak 1 other language fluently

::fr French - I can read/write/speak it without much thinking and with natives understanding me clearly.
I was C1 level when I started my study abroad program back in September. I think I've improved quite a lot since then.

I used to speak ::jp Japanese when I was a child. ::es Spanish, I understand it passively via French and Tagalog vocabulary (since about 30% of Tagalog vocabulary is Spanish words). Same with ::it Italian, I understand it passively because of speaking French.

Medousa
7th April 2013, 09:18
Hello guys,
I am new here and i am glad that i'm here.

Well,this is a subject that i love. I love learning foreign languages and i try it by myself.

My native language is Greek ::gr , so i can speak, understand and write fluently in Greek.

I can speak, write and understand very well Engish ::uk .

I don't know what i remember in French (3 years at school, 4 years with teacher) because i didn't like the language.my mother liked French ::fr ...

I love Spanish!!! I started learning Spanish::es by myself three years ago and i go on. The bad thing in learning by yourself a foreign language, i think that it is that you can't learn very well the grammar. I have learnt many words in spanish, i can read but i have difficulties on writing and speaking. I love spanish, as i said before, i want to visit Spain as soon as possible.

I love Italy too. I just can understand some words. I have learned very few things about this language in the university. It's so excited to listen to Italian. ::it

I tried to learn Swedish ::se by myself. IT IS IMPOSSIBLE!!! I want to learn swedish or danish ::dk. I like Scandinavian Mythology (and i love Greek Mythology).

I want to visit Spain, Italy and Scandinavia(all countries).

EmperorG
7th April 2013, 09:22
I speak ::gr as ma mother tongue xbike
Also, I speak well ::en n' not so well ::bg :D I'll start learnin' ::de or ::ru in a couple of years xbike I also make some ::fr lessons in school, but I don't remember anything :lol:

Nikkita
7th April 2013, 14:09
My mother tongue is Turkish.

I can speak English fluently.Also I can tell some basic stuff in German aaaand a'lil Russian.
I want to learn Hebrew,Japanese and Chinese after them.

Quent91
9th April 2013, 12:07
::fr French - I can read/write/speak it without much thinking and with natives understanding me clearly.
I was C1 level when I started my study abroad program back in September. I think I've improved quite a lot since then.

Your French is as good as if it was your mother tongue ;)

wyq614
9th April 2013, 19:17
::na - Native

::uk + ::es - language that I have learned systematically

::fr - I only took very few lessons of French and then I went to Cuba to study and had to stop...

::pt - Because of the similarity to Spanish I can understand, but can't really speak, I wish I will have time to learn.

::de + ::ru - I can only greet people in these two languages, I wish I could have learned more.

Amir
10th April 2013, 18:58
::ir Persian - Native
::uk English - Very good knowledge
::lb Arabic - Good knowledge
::fr French - Good knowledge
::es - Spanish - Good knowledge
::it - Italian - Basic knowledge
::jp - Japanese - Basic knowledge
::se - Swedish - Some words
::de - German - Biergarten!!!

satinelamort
21st May 2013, 00:31
::de German - native speaker
::uk English - started when I was 9 years old, lived in the USA and in England for some time, so pretty ok I guess.
::fr French - studied the language in school for about 6 years. I enjoy reading in French and since Verne is my favorite author I just had to give it a shot. But in terms of speaking... meh. Though one of my friends is from Switzerland, so I might catch up again.
::it Italian - I only know the basics. Wish I had the patience to continue since I really like the flow of the language.
::nl Dutch - I can understand some basics. I myself speak a little Plattdtsch (lower German) and it's quite similar.

Languages I want to take a look at during the next years:
::se
::cz

choyceyn
5th July 2013, 06:10
::na mother tongue
::jp nearly count as second mother tongue, my mother speaks it with me
::uk as everyone uses
::fr I would say my French level is intermediate
::se such a beautiful language, and I'm learning it. Proficiency gets better and better (btw, anyone who speaks Swedish as native language, anyone who knows Swedish, anyone who is also learning Swedish, anyone who has intention to rock Swedish world, anyone who is interested in Swedish, and any other people, let's rock it together.)

MINOR:
::no::dk, since these two languages share a lot with Swedish, and I can nearly understand Norwegian, if I pay more attention to the pronunciation, Danish won't be a problem either.
::is it shares less similarity with Danish Norwegian or Swedish, but it's easy for me though.
::ru, learnt it before, but forgot most of what I learnt. Still be able to speak it.

Avalon
5th July 2013, 11:51
::be ::nl Dutch
There we are. My mother tongue is Dutch, but I speak the Flemish variant which is much softer than regular Dutch. Many people say that it's very easy to learn because of the English, French and German influences in it. That's true, but it has many tricky and unknown aspects in it, which I will sum up:

1. Pronunciation.
Easy? Absolutely not! Dutch is a language which don't use letters like , , , , etc. Because of this, people easily think that Dutch hasn't many sounds, but actually it's one of the languages with the most diphthongs in it! For sounds like these, we put 2 or more vowels by each other.

ei // ij - You need to learn the use of these by heart. They sound the same. (mei - May or schrijven - to write)
ou // au - You need to learn the use also by heart. They sound the same. (mouw - sleeve or pauw - peacock)
oe - Like the oo in book (boek - book)
eu - Like ay in day, but you need to round your lips. (keuken - kitchen)
ui - Like ea in heat, but you need to round your lips. (huis - house)
aai // ooi // oei - Long vowels with a 'j' sound (haai - shark, mooi - beautiful, boei - buoy)
ieuw // eeuw - (nieuw - new, leeuw - lion)
e // e // e - We have three sounds of e in our languages. It's very difficult for a foreigner to pronounce it right because of the lack of , and .
(herleven - to revive) The first e is like the e in pet, the second e is like the a in day and the third e is like the e in taken.
aa // ee // uu // oo // ie - The long versions of the vowels.
g // g - Belgian G sounds soft and the Dutch G sounds (except in some regions) harsh.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EVdCm6WeVBA

2. Verbs.
Very similar to the German verbal uses. As I said, there are some excpetions and tricky aspects in it, but I'm not going to speak about all of these, just the basics.

Normal use:
To work // Worked // Worked - Werken // Werkte // Gewerkt
To Play // Played // Played - Spelen // Speelde // Gespeeld

It's tricky to get the ending of the past participle. The rule is if the last letter of the infinitive minus 'en' is in the word " 't kofschip," then you need to use 't' and if not, it's 'd'
Werken - en = Werk, k is in 't kofschip -> t
Spelen - en = Spel, l is not in 't kofschip -> d

Irregulars:
To Help // Helped // Helped - Helpen // Hielp // Geholpen
To Sing // Sang // Sung - Zingen // Zong // Gezongen
...

And there are also the infamous 'd/t - fouten'
I won't explain these but I will give you some excercises and you need to fill in the right ending of the word.

Ik wor(d-t-dt) aangevallen door een beer.
Je wor(d-t-dt) aangevallen door een beer.
Je broer wor(d-t-dt) aangevallen door een beer.
Hij wor(d-t-dt) aangevallen door een beer.
Wor(d-t-dt) ik aangevallen door een beer?
Wor(d-t-dt) je aangevallen door een beer?
Wor(d-t-dt) je broer aangevallen door een beer?
Wor(d-t-dt) hij aangevallen door een beer?

Solution:

Ik word aangevallen door een beer.
Je wordt aangevallen door een beer.
Je broer wordt aangevallen door een beer.
Hij wordt aangevallen door een beer.
Word ik aangevallen door een beer?
Word je aangevallen door een beer?
Wordt je broer aangevallen door een beer?
Wordt hij aangevallen door een beer?

3. Plural.
The plural forms in English remarks them with putting an 's' at the end. In Dutch, we put 'en' at the end. Our infinitives end also with 'en' which make it for foreigners extremely difficult to see the difference between them. But that's only the first remark.

Barrel = Vat -> Barrels = Vaten. Ok, that seems very easy and normal!

Bath = Bad -> Baths = Baden. Ok, normal too. But there's also the verb 'baden' wich means 'to bathe.'
I'm going to bathe in different baths -> Ik ga baden in verschillende baden. Getting more difficult, right?

Trail // True toad = Pad -> Trails // True Toads = Paden. Well, that goes for 'trails', but the plural of True Toads in Dutch is padden.
Cat = Kat -> Cats = Katten
City = Stad -> Cities = Staden or Stadden you would think, but it's actually steden (And do you know which of the three e's we are using here?)


Lake = Meer -> Lakes = Meeren, it's meren.
Example = Voorbeeld -> Examples = Voorbelden, it's voorbeelden.


::fr French
In Flanders, you get this language first when you are 10 years old. We need to learn it because it's a language of our country, and that just makes sense in my eyes. It's a lovely language and I speak, write and read it very easily. It's grammar can be tricky sometimes with their many exceptions, but some of there verb uses are very logical. Their past time for example (Imparfait) has always the same endings. (-ais, -ais, -ait-, -ions, -iez and -aient) and that makes this language a fun to learn. It also sounds beautiful.

::uk English
At school, I educated this language when I was 13 years old. It's fairly easy and very important in the world. At that time I spoke fluently English because I played Pokmon (:lol:) and I chatted many times in English with people across the world. Lovely language, but I struggle sometimes on the word use and the word order. But that's because of my Dutch language decent, as I already has said, with our strange word order.

::de German
Learned this language first at school when I was 15 years old. Very difficult grammar use, but when you are used to it, it's very easy. I can pronounce it very well and I can write it. I understand many words of German because of my Dutch decent. Their verb use is a piece of cake for me, because it's very similar to the Dutch use. (The usage is similar, not the words.) Not a very beautiful language, but it's the third language in Belgium, so it's just normal that we need to learn it.

Furthermore, I want to learn Spanish, Portuguese and Danish. ::es ::pt ::dk

Wow, this is actually a wall of text. I had some time it seems xheat

Kaja
5th July 2013, 12:56
ok, my turn. i speak:

::sl fluently, since it's my mother language and i'm also studying it.

::uk started to learn it when i was five and ever since then i speak it almost everyday.

::de i've been learning it for seven years in school, but i can only understand some phrases and can talk a little bit.

i learned ::hr and ::rs by myself (mostly from listening to songs) and i understand around 80-90% of them.

i also understand some bits of the other slavic languages.

thanks to rudolph van veen i know, how to say, "pepper", "salt", "potatoes" and so on in ::nl :mrgreen:

i would really like to learn ::it and ::hu beacuse they are also the official languages here (the two minorities we have here) plus i'm i love with "crisalide" and i really like "kedvesem" :D

EDIT: oh, i forgot to add, that i'm trying to learn the slovenian sign language (if it counts)

Yoni
5th July 2013, 15:07
You forgot the most frustrating part in Dutch, Brentie.

that you have to know next to which words to put een or without een ;_;

seb89
5th July 2013, 15:51
I always thought Dutch was an easy language to learn, but after my intern as a teacher Dutch for foreigners. I foud out it's not easy at all. It was an absolute nightmare when I needed to study all those grammar rules. Andthe pluricentric aspect of Dutch makes it not easy for foreigners to learn it.


You forgot the most frustrating part in Dutch, Brentie.

that you have to know next to which words to put een or without een ;_;

What do you mean?

Avalon
5th July 2013, 16:24
I think he means:

The girl - Het meisje
The woman - De vrouw

The tree - De boom
The forest - Het bos

:lol:

Oh, and actually the word 'een' doesn't makes any sense. You have een, which means 'one.' And you have een, which means 'a.'
The first one, you pronounce it as you write it (long e) but the second one is with the schwa e (voiceless e)
Exception alert :S

Yoni
5th July 2013, 16:27
No no, that like in some sentences you must put een before a word (like.. policeman?)
and in some sentences you don't put een

and there's no rule about it :lol:

seb89
5th July 2013, 17:57
We use 'een' for countable singular nouns. In other cases we don't use een. But it's the same in English.

Ik lees een boek - I read a book
Ik lees boeken - I read books
Ik drink water - I drink water

DannyDS
5th July 2013, 18:10
Yoni learning Dutch, now I've seen it all. xcrazy

Avalon
5th July 2013, 18:32
We use 'een' for countable singular nouns. In other cases we don't use een. But it's the same in English.

Ik lees een boek - I read a book
Ik lees boeken - I read books
Ik drink water - I drink water
He meant 'geen'

Er is geen fruit in de mand - There is no fruit in the basket.
Er is geen politieman op straat - There is not a policeman on the street.

But that's because 'fruit' isn't a real person or something. It's actually more easy in Dutch. xcrazy

seb89
5th July 2013, 21:40
Ohh yeah negation can be complicated in Dutch. 'Geen' for nouns, 'niet' in other cases.

Tbh the plural in Dutch isn't that difficult. Most nouns use the '-en', some use '-s'. There are a few exceptions (stad -> steden, kind --> kinderen), if you know how to pronounce the vowels, it's very easy, then you automatically know if you need to add a consonant or to leave out a vowel.

People learning Dutch have difficulties with diphthongs, inversion.

CC92
5th July 2013, 21:45
Dutch looketh very easy to me. I think I'd learn it pretty quickly. xhmm

seb89
5th July 2013, 23:09
Dutch looketh very easy to me. I think I'd learn it pretty quickly. xhmm

Grammar should be relatively easy for you, prononciation and vocabulary would be more difficult, nevertheless easy to understand, but more difficult to speak (because of interference with German :) ).

Anyway, all depends on motivation.

CC92
5th July 2013, 23:29
Dutch looketh very easy to me. I think I'd learn it pretty quickly. xhmmGrammar should be relatively easy for you, prononciation and vocabulary would be more difficult, nevertheless easy to understand, but more difficult to speak (because of interference with German :) ).

Anyway, all depends on motivation.

I do not know how the Hollandish Dutch 'G' gets pronounced or where the difference to the German 'ch' (or actually: Russian х) sound is. xthink

Mattan
5th July 2013, 23:49
::se Native
::fi Native
::uk Pretty much fluent - I blame video games and the Internet.
::fr Four years of studies, ongoing.
::es Two years of studies, ongoing.
::dk Some studies, most knowledge based on Swedish.
::no All knowledge based on Swedish
::gr A few weeks of studies, and my memory is fading. Hooray!
::pt ::br Especially Brazilian Portuguese because of my tastes in music and cultural interests. Haven't studied any, but regularly sing in Portuguese and read news in Portuguese. Understanding it being spoken is nearly impossible... let alone speaking it. This one is definitely next on my list of languages to learn.

I can read and somewhat understand spoken ::de, but I can say... well... nothing. :lol:
Also used to understand ::is quite a bit, but that one's faded somewhat.