PDA

View Full Version : Studying abroad



Gera11
15th November 2013, 16:14
I created this thread because there are many people on this forum who aren't from UK or USA and (maybe) they want to study abroad, for example in United Kingdom.

Is anyone here who is a student at a university which is not from his homeland? Can this person share his experience? :D

( I know I'm a little subjective because I'm the last year and I'm extremely curious about this subject :oops: )

Celia
15th November 2013, 19:23
Interesting thread, let's see what people tell :D I've signed up for an Erasmus grant to study next year in ::uk or ::ie. If I get lucky I might be writting in this thread in a few months :mrgreen:

anto475
15th November 2013, 19:52
Interesting thread, let's see what people tell :D I've signed up for an Erasmus grant to study next year in ::uk or ::ie. If I get lucky I might be writting in this thread in a few months :mrgreen:

Where in Ireland have you applied?

I'm applying for Istanbul, Fez, Budapest, Warsaw, or Prague this year, in that order. Really hope I get anywhere though, I have loads of friends studying abroad this year from Japan to Hungary to Argentina and they're having the best time!

Celia
15th November 2013, 19:57
Where in Ireland have you applied?

I'm applying for Istanbul, Fez, Budapest, Warsaw, or Prague this year, in that order. Really hope I get anywhere though, I have loads of friends studying abroad this year from Japan to Hungary to Argentina and they're having the best time!

Well, I'm going with a friend and we are interested in Galway :D At first I wanted to go to Edinburgh but they ask for a very demanding English exam (the worst part is definitely the price, no way I'm paying 200€ :lol:)
But I'm fine with pretty much every city in the British Isles (except for London because it's just too big and expensive I think. it must be a mind-blowing place though :p)
They always say it's a great year, I can't wait either xyaay

Nicholas123
15th November 2013, 20:01
Interesting thread, let's see what people tell :D I've signed up for an Erasmus grant to study next year in ::uk or ::ie. If I get lucky I might be writting in this thread in a few months :mrgreen:

Ah! I wish u to make it come true Celia! Studying abroad is indeed a great experience! :D

EDIT : I will post later my experience from my 1 year in Paris! :D

r3gg13
15th November 2013, 21:13
I have quite a lot to say in this topic!

I finished my study abroad year a few months ago, and it DEFINITELY was the best part of my undergraduate studies!

The whole context of studying abroad was different for me than my EU counterparts because I wasn't an Erasmus student. So I wouldn't bother touching on some subjects like fees and other bureaucratic things because they're irrelevant for non-US students.

I'm gonna do a little comparison of what was difficult for me:

My gosh, studying in France is so different compared to studying in the United States. The class structure, the bureaucracy, the attitude, it was a complete culture shock. That was even a bigger culture shock than the difference in lifestyle. I mean come on, just 1 or 2 tests and paper in 1 semester for each class and those were the only basis for the grade xfaint. In California, I was used to having more projects and exams to do for each class; those were the things that got me going and kept me on track. Plus there were tons to turn in at every lecture. So, you could see your progress along the way. In France, I didn't have that except for 1 class where we turned in reaction papers for each lecture session. That was scary because there was no way for me to know whether I was understanding well or not. Also, I was so used to having access to professors outside of classes. French professors don't have "office hours". The mindset was also very different when it came to analyzing and expounding ideas. This was very interesting because you have to determine your professor's sweet spot when it came to analyzing. So you have to completely listen to whatever your professor preaches. In USA, analysis had to be daring and outside-the-box; you had to make your own analytic character and signature. That was easier for me because I don't necessarily agree with almost everything that professors say. Needless to say, it was a wonderful experience being exposed to different methodology, mind-set, and educational system.

For the most part living in France wasn't that different. Sure, it's a different culture and society with different values and mores. But when you get at the base of it all, it was still a Western country. Adjusting and assimilating wasn't that difficult.

Stereotypical stuff that you have heard a million times, but are true either way:

Living in a different country is really fun! You get to meet tons of new people, you're pretty much fish out of water. However hard you try to assimilate, there are tons of cultural nuances that WILL catch you off-guard. For me, the most difficult thing was people not being receptive of hugs :lol:. That's the way we greet friends in California! When I see friends I tend to just open my arms while walking to them, then hug them as I scream their name. French people found that odd :lol:. Since that was one of the biggest difficulties, getting used to things wasn't really difficult at all.

For the record, I originally wanted to study either in Brussels (because of Belgium being the home of graphic novels) or any Francophone city where there wasn't much Anglophones so I could practice my French. I ended up not going to Brussels because there wasn't a direct exchange program between my university and any university in Brussels. I'd have to go through a different US university or a 3rd party provider which would have made grade and credit transfers difficult.

MyHeartIsYours
15th November 2013, 22:07
Id say, if you have even an inclination to do it, go for it! Anyone I know who's gone abroad for this year (their last year) is absolutely loving it - definitely a great experience.
For myself, I looked into studying abroad and went to some of the meetings then decided it wouldnt be for me so it's definitely something that you should take time to decide about.

My uni has a HUGE international student population, though most are from China followed by those from the Middle East, Canada and the United States, there's also quite a few Europeans about. Some courses like Business are dominated by foreign students, my course History is pretty much 100% British/Irish however. The Chinese students definitely have a problem integrating, they dont mix with the Brits and just stick together. But I've known no problem with any of the others and quite like having them around :).

anto475
15th November 2013, 22:14
Id say, if you have even an inclination to do it, go for it! Anyone I know who's gone abroad for this year (their last year) is absolutely loving it - definitely a great experience.
For myself, I looked into studying abroad and went to some of the meetings then decided it wouldnt be for me so it's definitely something that you should take time to decide about.

My uni has a HUGE international student population, though most are from China followed by those from the Middle East, Canada and the United States, there's also quite a few Europeans about. Some courses like Business are dominated by foreign students, my course History is pretty much 100% British/Irish however. The Chinese students definitely have a problem integrating, they dont mix with the Brits and just stick together. But I've known no problem with any of the others and quite like having them around :).

I wonder is that a thing about students from Asia so. My college has a large international population too, but nearly all the study-abroad students integrate so well, apart from the Japanese ones. Like my friend has two housemates from America and they're practically Irish at this stage, and the Germans on a club committee with me get along so well with everyone, but my flatmate last year was secretary of the Japanese Society and he was the only Irish person I saw the Japanese students socialising with. I suppose Irish and UK culture is much closer to that of the US or Germany than Japan or China, but there are students from India and the Middle East in my college too that integrate seamlessly!

aletem
16th November 2013, 10:01
Here, in Canadian universities (been to two), Chinese, Korean, and Middle Eastern people tend to stick with their own clan. You can see them in the cafeterias grouped together, in libraries, coffee and study breaks. And I'm not tripping, I'm just stating what I've been observing. Also, African international students (Nigeria, Ghana) tend to stick together. Exceptions exist obviously. Not every single person does that!
Europeans mingle very well with anyone and so do South Americans. I recall I had a problem with a Korean roommate. He was using my bed and my personal space (table, etc) whenever I would go home without asking. I wouldn't mind anyone do that if we have normal communication between us. And the communication wasn't there, no matter if I tried and tried. His friends were also annoying, because they would enter the room without knocking.
Generally, students who come here just to study have fun and enjoy the experience. :)

seb89
16th November 2013, 15:41
If you have the possibility, you must do it. It was the best thing ever happened to me!

Since I'm working in Brussels, I feel like I have this experience all over again, my colleagues are French speaking except one, she is Flemish like me, when I go out in Brussels, I meet so many different nationalities. I like the fact, that I can speak French, Dutch, Spanish and English every single day and meet new people from different areas.

Gera11
16th November 2013, 18:16
off-topic: is funny how I keep getting this adv every time I'm checking this thread :lol: They know :o
http://i.imgur.com/xzHQezv.png

alca
16th November 2013, 22:21
I'm studying abroad. I moved to Sweden in 2010 and I began studying at the uni in 2011. It's very difficult because of the language and of course my program (chemical analysis engineering) but other than that it's a great experience. I don't really know how the Greek unis work coz I haven't studied at all in Greece but I know a few things from my friends and I'm definitely NOT regretting doing my undergrad here in Sweden.

Sultana
17th November 2013, 14:22
I've never studied abroad but I have a great number of friends that now are studying in Europe and Asia.
Most of them are in Czech Republic and China but I donno about the quality of education in such countries

Almah
20th December 2013, 15:00
Hi Gera11. Where are you from?

I am currently studying in England and I am having a great time over here. I am going to talk about various aspects in life I had starting from the university. I am at the third year in uni and I have to say that the education system here is at the finest. The teachers are awesome and all the students give you courage and motivation to learn and study. The test and exams are not hard but if you want to achieve I would recommend you learning beyond the books and reading teachers give to you. This is a guide for students who want to study in England Study Abroad in England - England Study Guide for International Students (http://www.studying-in-england.org) and you can find all the information you need there.

Now I would like you to inform that people in England are kind of cold. You have to stay a lot with them to have their trust. But when that happens, you are going to have so much fun and such a good friend.

The costs in England are kind of the same as in Europe. Prices are cheaper than US definitely. But even though there are different costs you might wanna start looking for jobs so you can pay for your spending. You also should definitely apply for scholarships. There are many scholarships for International students, here are some that are up to date and you can apply immediately:
1.Maastricht University High Potential scholarships - Maastricht University (http://www.maastrichtuniversity.nl/web/ServiceCentres/SSC/Scholarships1/AvailableScholarships1/MaastrichtUniversityHighPotentialScholarships1.htm )
2. Mawista Scholarship 2013/2014 (http://www.mawista.com/en/scholarship)
3. Radboud Scholarship Programme - Master (http://www.ru.nl/masters/finances/scholarships-grants/read_more/rsprogramme/)

The above ones are some that I am planning to apply. You should check them out. If you decide to come and study in England I would love to meet you anytime.
Respect

Tinchey
20th December 2013, 17:49
I'd love to go out for a semester or a year, but my choices for my studies are limited to Italy and France. :(

Gera11
20th December 2013, 17:54
The above ones are some that I am planning to apply. You should check them out. If you decide to come and study in England I would love to meet you anytime.
Respect

Thank you for those nice advices and info :D xrunhug

VictoriaLT
27th December 2013, 22:08
I am Lithuanian studying in Scotland. My decision to come to different country is the best one I have ever made so far. It is completely distinctive experience living away from home country. Leaving your own comfort zone challenges you and then you discover of how much you are actually capable of. Of course, making international friends is probably the most rewarding part of studying abroad. I don't regret of my decision, and I am very thankful to my mum for her valuable support. :}

Celia
30th March 2014, 12:53
I've got to submit my list of destinations I'd like today and I really don't know what to do :( I'd love to go to Edinburgh but I think I'm not ready for such a demanding and different educational system (always grateful to the shitty University of Málaga for that xcookie). Then my friend and I are considering Birmingham because the university seems good and a friend of hers could give us some advice on lodging but (no offence to West-Midlanders around) is quite ugly and from what I read on the internet, quite dangerous xcrazy. Our third option is Newcastle. Any comments, useful info...? What would you do if you were me?
Galway in Ireland looks like a nice option too...

MyHeartIsYours
30th March 2014, 18:58
Newcastle I definitely recommend, beautiful and fun city and the university's really great too from what I know.

Celia
30th March 2014, 19:02
Newcastle I definitely recommend, beautiful and fun city and the university's really great too from what I know.

Thanks! :p Unfortunately my friend doesn't seem to be really into it, right now our first choice is Edinburgh (I coulld change my mind for the 1000th time today though :lol:)

Charly
30th March 2014, 20:07
I'm thinking of signing up for Camp America :p